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November 22, 2017

10 Motivational Sales Quotes from Famous Athletes

Becoming a great athlete requires passion, perseverance, and hard work. And just like sales, sometimes in sports you need to fail before you can succeed. These motivational sales quotes from some of the world’s best athletes show that attitude and perspective are key when it comes to achieving your goals. Because whether you’re playing shortstop in MLB or working in sales, being out in the field can be thrilling and challenging. These motivational sales quotes can help you out along the way!

 

Here are 10 inspirational quotes from famous athletes:

Babe Ruth image
10 Motivational Sales Quotes from Famous Athletes
  1. “Never let the fear of striking out get in your way.” – Babe Ruth

When you’re in sales, the prospect of striking out with a potential buyer can be intimidating. However, don’t allow fear of failure stop you from going out there and giving it your all. Believing in yourself is the first step when it comes to succeeding in sales.

Sales requires talent, but even the most talented people in the world are nothing without their team! Click To Tweet
MIchael Jordan image
Motivational words from Michael Jordan, basketball superstar.

2. “Talent wins games, but teamwork and intelligence win championships.” – Michael Jordan

Without a doubt, being a great salesperson requires talent. But even the most talented individuals in the world are nothing without their team! Here at Cydcor, we support each other and work together in order to achieve great things.

Bo Jackson image
Bo Jackson’s inspiring words of wisdom.

3. “Set your goals high, and don’t stop till you get there.” – Bo Jackson

Never underestimate what you can accomplish. The higher you set your goals, the more you will achieve in the long run. With hard work and determination, you can do anything.

Mia Hamm image
Motivational words from soccer star, Mia Hamm. Image by Johnmaxmena2 – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=58856828

4. “Celebrate what you’ve accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed.” – Mia Hamm

Accomplishing your goals is an amazing feeling. It’s a sign of hard work paying off! Every time you reach one of your goals, set a new one, and always strive for improvement.

“Champions keep playing until they get it right.” – Billie Jean King Click To Tweet
Billie Jean King image
Words from Billie Jean King photographed by ©Lynn Gilbert 1978, New York.

5. “Champions keep playing until they get it right.” – Billie Jean King

As the old adage goes, practice makes perfect. In sales, you might make mistakes from time to time. Instead of getting down on yourself, learn from what you did wrong, and get ready to hit the field again with more knowledge and experience than before.

Wayne Gretzky playing hockey.
Motivational words from Wayne Gretzky. By Rick Dikeman (Image:Wayne Gretzky 1997.jpg) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons
6. “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.” – Wayne Gretsky

Sales is all about putting yourself out there. If you don’t try, you’ll have no idea of what you’re capable of. When you see an opportunity for a potential client, go for it, and you’ll end up scoring in no time.

The U.S. Ski Team's Lindsey Vonn shows off her hardware, including Olympic medals and three years of Audi FIS World Cup crystal globes at the World Cup Finals in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Vonn won her third straight overall title, along with crystal globes for the downhill, super G and super combined. (U.S. Ski Team/Doug Haney)
Motivational quote from Linsey Vonn. By U.S. Ski Team/Doug Haney (http://www.flickr.com/photos/usskiteam/4437390570/) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
7. “When you fall, get right back up. Just keep going, keep pushing.” – Lindsey Vonn

The best salespeople are individuals with exceptional drive. You may come across bumps in the road, but don’t sweat it! Challenges can be an excellent learning opportunity. Just maintain a strong mental attitude and keep going.

Serena Williams playing tennis.
Words from Serena Williams. By Александр Осипов from Ukraine (Serena Williams Uploaded by Flickrworker) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
8. “I am lucky that whatever fear I have inside me, my desire to win is always stronger.” – Serena Williams

Sales attracts strong, passionate individuals. Combat your doubts with your desire to succeed, and you’ll be on your way to achieving your very best.

Derek Jeter playing ball.
Motivational quote from Derek Jeter. By Keith Allison – Original version from Flickr; description page is here, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7742257

9. “There may be people that have more talent than you, but there’s no excuse for anyone to work harder than you do.” – Derek Jeter

Some things in your career aren’t under your control, but one thing that is under your control is your work ethic. Putting in 100% effort is what makes people great at what they do, and giving it your all until the very last minute will give you amazing results.

Michael Phelps swimming.
Words from Michael Phelps. By Karen Blaha (Flickr profile) (Original webpage:[1] Website publisher: Flickr) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
10. “You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get.” – Michael Phelps
Always dream big. Strong aspirations will transform your career from ordinary to extraordinary. If you believe you can do great things, then you will.

These famous athletes know that it takes more than just hard work to be your best; it takes passion and grit to overcome setbacks, fight through pain, and believe in yourself no matter what! Hopefully, these quotes will help inspire your own drive to push through challenges and reach your dreams.

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services located in Agoura Hills, CA. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, Cydcor has come a long way. Cydcor takes pride in having exceptional sales professionals and providing our clients with proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.

November 17, 2017

The Top Five Books for Managers #3: Leadership is an Art

Book cover art for Leadership is an Art
The Top Five Books for Managers: Leadership is an Art

This article is the third in a series of five blog posts from management expert, and Cydcor Chief People Officer, Jeannie Finkel. In this series, Jeannie recommends the Top Five Books she believes can help you transform your management style and become a better, more effective leader.

 

There are some clear cut skills that can help anyone become a better manager, but it can take a harder-to-define set of qualities to be a strong leader. Management expert Jeannie Finkel recommends Max De Pree’s Leadership is an Art to anyone looking to find out how to establish your unique point of view as a leader, fill your organization with passion, and foster loyalty and drive within your organization. Great managers show enormous faith in the potential of their people, and this book can help you discover how to lead by establishing relationships based on mutual trust, building a culture of inclusiveness, and by offering constant support.

 

Below, Jeannie Finkel explains why every manager and aspiring manager should read Max De Pree’s book on leadership, to build their identity as a leader and help shape their vision for their organization:

 

Book #3: Leadership is an Art

Author: Max De Pree

 

Short summary: This is a beautifully written collection of leadership principles written by Max De Pree, son of the founder and former CEO and Chairman of Herman Miller, Inc. Herman Miller is a nearly 100-year-old company, but it has consistently been recognized throughout its history as one of the best companies to work for in America, as well as one of the best managed and most innovative.

If you’re looking to understand how leaders can create a culture and set of principles that can stand the test of time, this book is a great place to start.

De Pree opens with a story about his father as a young manager whose experience with the death of a long-time employee shaped his philosophy of leadership. De Pree’s father went on to weave those ideas into the fabric of his company and the hearts and minds of his sons, who ran the company after him. The various chapters, each written as a little essay, bring this philosophy to life, starting with the question everyone asks at one point or another: “What is Leadership?”

 The most important aspect of this book is the belief in the potential of people that it expresses. Click To Tweet

 

What you’ll learn: The most important aspect of this book is the humanity and belief in the potential of people and the human spirit that it expresses. If you are not familiar with the concept of servant leadership, by the time you finish reading, you will be, and hopefully will be inspired by it.

De Pree also lays out his ground rules for how work relationships should operate based on mutual accountability. He looks at the capitalist system and helps us imagine how it could be enhanced through a more inclusive mindset where everyone participates. He provides guidance on how to stimulate innovation by recognizing and supporting “giants”, and he reminds us of the importance of sharing culture, values and shared history through storytelling.  De Pree also offers techniques for becoming alert to the signs of complacency in ourselves, and he teaches us how to recognize the signals of organizational entropy, as well.

 

Every time I read this book (which is about once a year!) I take something new away from it.

 

Why it’s a must read:

This is an enduring classic. I came upon this one because I fell in love with Herman Miller’s products and services, and their exquisite attention to design, aesthetics, functionality and harmony in creating a work environment in which people were inspired and enabled to do their best. I had the privilege to have HMI as a client when I was in the recruiting business, and in order to do my best work and find the right people for them, I had to understand the culture.  The manager I worked with encouraged me to study the company and read the book – and I was captivated. It helped me visualize the kind of company I hoped to be a part of and the kind of leadership I wanted to practice.  It left me with a sense of my obligations as a leader which I’ve tried hard to live up to ever since.

 

And on top of everything else, the writing is absolutely beautiful – it’s like reading poetry!

This book let me see the kind of company I hoped to work for & the kind of leader I wanted to be. Click To Tweet

 

If you found this book recommendation helpful, make sure to check back for upcoming posts in this series to learn about two more books that can help managers build their skills, earn the trust of their team, and lead their organizations to success.  In case you missed it, don’t forget to read last week’s post about the book The Elements of Style.

 

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

portrait of Jeanie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.
Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.

Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales, has more than twenty-five years of business experience, managing human resources and administration at top firms. Jeannie served for nearly twelve years as a Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Charles Schwab & Co. Jeannie was also Head of Human Resources and Administration for a leading asset management firm, and served as Managing Director, Talent Management Systems and Strategies for a Fortune 100 organization. Jeannie later became a Partner with leading global retained search firm, Heidrick & Struggles. With years of experience managing teams and overseeing organizations, Jeannie is a seasoned expert in management, administration, and leadership.

 

November 15, 2017

Showing Gratitude at Work during Thanksgiving

You are awesome words revealed under peeled away paper
Showing Gratitude at Work

It’s always a boon to morale to show gratitude to employees. Making sure employees know their hard work doesn’t go unnoticed is a nice reminder that the bottom line isn’t the only thing that matters in sales. Is there a better time to explore ways of showing gratitude and the positive effects it can have at work than Thanksgiving?

Ways to Show Gratitude at Work:

Call-Outs: A simple “good job” in any form – whether it’s during a meeting, included in a company-wide email or posted on a bulletin board in a common area – goes a long way. It may mean more when the recognition comes from management or the C-suite level, but don’t discount the value of peer recognition. Encourage your employees to keep everyone informed if they think part of their team is doing exceptional work. It goes a long way towards fostering a team-oriented environment and building community within your office.

Rewards: Verbal call-outs are great, but tangible gifts and experiences can leave an even bigger mark. Gifts don’t have to be extravagant; even something as simple as a photo frame for the team member’s desk, a funny coffee mug, or a stylish journal is a great way to recognize someone. Personalizing a reward to suit an employee’s taste goes the extra mile toward positive reinforcement. Gift cards, a lunch out or tickets to a show also make great tokens of recognition. We’re not suggesting you should make handing out awards a daily occurrence, but recognizing employees who consistently go above and beyond is a great practice.

Group Activities: The only potential downside to singling employees out is the risk of alienating other employees who feel they were passed over. So much of business is a team effort, so why not plan a team outing that lets people relax and get to know each other on a more personal level? Dinner out, sporting events, leisure sports like bowling, scavenger hunts, live shows and movies are all great options.

If group outings feel too costly or burdensome to coordinate, consider buying lunch for the office. Planning a potluck and supplying the main dish can also bring people together.

At Cydcor, we work hard to achieve results, but we shouldn't forget the people who make those achievements… Click To Tweet

At Cydcor, we’re constantly working to achieve outstanding results on behalf of our clients, but that doesn’t mean forgetting the amazing people who make those achievements possible. It’s important to take the time to remind your employees that your own success and that of the company depends on them, their passion, their drive, and the time and effort they devote to helping the team reach its goals.

We hope you and your work family all have a safe and happy holiday season.

Happy Thanksgiving!

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services located in Agoura Hills, CA. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, we’ve come a long way. Cydcor takes pride in having exceptional sales professionals and providing our clients with proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.

November 10, 2017

The Top Five Books for Managers #2: The Elements of Style

Book cover art the elements of style
The Top Five Books For Managers #2: The Elements of Style

This is the second in a series of five posts for management expert, and Cydcor Chief People Officer, Jeannie Finkel. In this series, Jeannie recommends the Top Five Books she believes can help you transform your management style and become a better, more effective leader.

 

Writing well isn’t just a nice talent you can use to impress friends and colleagues. Sure, it can do that as well, but effective writing is much more important than that. Clear, concise writing is essential to be an effective communicator, a skill you must have if you ever hope to succeed in a leadership or management role. The way you write and communicate can mean the difference between getting the job or not, gaining approval for a critical project, earning the confidence of your team or organization, and the ability to explain yourself in cases when your actions are not as well received or understood. Effective writing ability is not just nice, it’s critical. It can directly impact your ability to survive and thrive in the workplace and your future growth potential.

Clear, concise writing is an essential skill you must have to succeed in a leadership or management role. Click To Tweet

Below, Jeannie Finkel recommends a book she believes any manager must have to help improve writing ability and communication:

 

Book #2: The Elements of Style

 

Author: William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White

 

Short summary: If any aspect of your work involves written communication – beyond texting – and you want the quality of your writing to stand out, this little book will teach you what you need to know to master the core principles of writing clearly. It focuses on the fundamentals, clearly explaining proper usage and composition, and helping explain and address the rules of good writing that are most frequently violated.

 

This really isn’t a book you “read” per se. Rather, it’s a great reference tool that everyone who aspires to write well, or needs to influence, explain, or inspire would do well to study. It’s less than 100 pages, divided into three segments. The first segment is two chapters which give a set of “rules” for English usage and composition (you’ll remember grammar class in grade school!). Then there’s a terrific section about words and expressions that are most often misused – EVERYONE should review this part. The book ends with a set of 21 tips to keep in mind as you create your own writing style.

 

What you’ll learn: What you learn from this book really depends on what you need. If you’re newer to business and fresh from writing college papers, you might have to change your style to adapt to the brevity required for business writing, such as reports, PowerPoints, and emails. Find excellent advice to guide you through this transition under the sections entitled “Use definite, specific, concrete language” and “Omit needless words”.

 

Or, if you’ve been in the business world for some time and now need to or communications for publication, you’ll benefit from reviewing the chapter entitled, “Misused Words and Expressions”. We don’t notice many of these in our everyday conversations with friends, but they really stick out in a written piece!

 

Dip into the book enough and you’ll experience a true appreciation of the beauty and richness of our language, and realize the professor who wrote the original book truly loved his subject and hoped to pass on the art of communication to future generations.

 

Why it’s a must read: This is a desk reference I’ve kept with me ever since a rather embarrassing experience with a boss many years ago.  I had just been promoted to my first Vice President level assignment, working for someone who had a reputation for being extremely tough. I was a literature major in college, and I thought I wrote pretty well. I wanted to impress him and show I was worthy of the big new job and title, so I wrote a lengthy memo about something I thought he should consider changing. But, I was afraid to be too direct in case he thought I was overstepping. Instead, I made it so indirect and wishy washy that (as I realized later) it was impossible to figure out what I was trying to say.

 

Thankfully, rather than ripping up what I’d written and leaving it in shreds on my desk, he said nothing. Instead, after lunch, I came back to a little brown paper bag from the bookstore down the street with this book in it, sitting on top of a copy of my memo. I opened it up and looked at the content. My boss had gone so far as to check off the sections he thought I should read, and underline several key sentences in red ink. This was the President of a key business unit who’d taken the time to go out and get this book for me and do this!! After I got over feeling mortified, I rewrote the memo (it was probably two pages shorter) and went in to thank him and make my case, this time much more directly, confidently, and clearly. We went on to be a great team and work together for many years, and we are still good friends today. I credit him, and this book, with setting me on a path to becoming an effective business writer! Maybe it will do the same for you.

I credit this book with helping me become an effective business writer! Maybe it will do the same for you. Click To Tweet

Look out for upcoming posts in this series to learn about three more books every manager must have on his or her bookshelf to bolster professional growth and personal development. In case you missed it, don’t forget to read last week’s post about the book 13 Fatal Errors Managers Make and How you can Avoid Them.

 

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

portrait of Jeanie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.
Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.

Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales, has more than twenty-five years of business experience, managing human resources and administration at top firms. Jeannie served for nearly twelve years as a Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Charles Schwab & Co. Jeannie was also Head of Human Resources and Administration for a leading asset management firm, and served as Managing Director, Talent Management Systems and Strategies for a Fortune 100 organization. Jeannie later became a Partner with leading global retained search firm, Heidrick & Struggles. With years of experience managing teams and overseeing organizations, Jeannie is a seasoned expert in management, administration, and leadership.

November 8, 2017

How Occasional Boredom at Work Can Benefit Your Career

Woman with legs on desk at work
How Occasional Boredom Might Work Wonders for Your Career

We all want to love our jobs, and while most of us accept that not every part of our job can be our favorite thing to do, what happens when you start getting bored at work? Does that mean you’re doing something wrong or that your chosen career might not be right for you after all? Not necessarily. While you should never stay at a job you absolutely hate, feeling occasional boredom at work can actually mean that you’re making valuable progress you’re not even aware of.

Never stay at a job you hate, but feeling occasional boredom at work can mean you’re making progress… Click To Tweet

 

Here are five reasons why feeling a little bored at work can sometimes be a good thing:

  1. Mastery Takes Repetition; Lots of It: You can’t always be working on something new and exciting. Sometimes it’s all about doing the same things over and over again until you’re an expert at them. It’s that practice and experience that will drive you to the next level of success. And for some jobs, like sales, it takes a certain level of exact repetition to ensure success, because it’s a numbers game. You have to do the same pitch to hundreds of customers in order to ensure the right number of sales. Sales people call that the law of averages, and mastering your pitch by delivering it exactly the same way to as many customers as possible, is the ideal way to hit your sales goals.

Make the Most of It Tip: Rather than focusing on the monotony, remind yourself that even if you can’t see the improvements right away, you are getting better at what you do with each repetition.

 

Multi-tasking is great, but instead of bouncing from one thing to another, do one thing really well. Click To Tweet
  1. It means you’re focused: In today’s workplace, a lot of emphasis is put on multi-tasking, but bouncing from one thing to another, might mean that you’re not doing any one thing really well. Rather than shifting gears, what might be called for is digging deeper, even when a project or task gets tedious. If you start to feel bored, it might mean that you’re doing a good job of tuning into the project at hand, and for those of us used to constant distractions and stimulation, that level of focus can sometimes feel a little strange.

Make the Most of It Tip: Tell yourself you can check your emails, surf the web, get coffee, or spend ten minutes socializing with coworkers once you’ve finished the assignment in front of you. By giving yourself small rewards to work towards, the strange feeling of only paying attention one thing at a time might not feel so uncomfortable. At the end, you might be surprised to see how much you’ve accomplished, and it may help you enjoy those periods of focus a bit more the next time.

 

  1. It means you’re not skipping steps: Sometimes, when you become familiar with your job, and you know it like the back of your hand, it becomes tempting to start cutting corners. But being a little bored can be a good indication that you’re tackling the project as it needs to be tackled rather than handling only the lighter, easier version. Being efficient is great, but not at the expense of quality. Doing a job the right way, doesn’t always mean doing it the easy way.

Make the Most of it Tip: Rather than looking for ways to speed things along, take pride in the fact that you’re accurate and thorough. Tell yourself that doing things right is part of your personal brand, and know that it’s that attention to detail that will help you stand out amongst the competition.

 

  1. It can Signal that You’re Ready for a New Challenge: It can sometimes be hard to tell when you’re ready for a promotion or greater responsibility at work. It’s easy to let fear and self-doubt hold us back from asking for what we think we deserve. If you’re finding yourself bored because you can do your current job in your sleep, use that feeling as an excuse to ask for a big new project that demonstrates what else you’re capable of.

Make the Most of it Tip: Use those moments of boredom as opportunities to think through the case you’ll make to management for why you’re ready to move up to a new role. Use the ease with which you do your current tasks as part of your argument. Explain that the job has gotten so easy that you’re confident you could be doing more, and offer to help train your replacement to be as proficient at your current role as you are.

 

  1. Boredom can Leave Room for Innovation: When we’re always rushing to meet tight deadlines, it doesn’t leave a lot of room for creative thinking. Studies have shown that daydreaming may be good for our brains, and a reasonable amount of daydreaming can allow you the space to come up with those new and untested solutions that might prove to be game changers.

Make the Most of it Tip: When your mind starts to wander, take advantage of those moments by choosing to brainstorm new ideas for your company or ways you can make projects more efficient. In other words, decide to use your daydreams to benefit your company, and you may be surprised how that decision can boost your own career growth as well.

 

Like most things in life, boredom, in moderation, won’t hurt you, and it could even help you take your career to the next level. Remember that being great at your job may not be fun and exciting every day, but feeling the occasional boredom shouldn’t send you running for the hills either. Realize that even the greatest jobs will have ups and downs, and what may seem like a rough day today could be helping you toward that big win tomorrow.

 

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services located in Agoura Hills, CA. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, we’ve come a long way. Cydcor takes pride in having exceptional sales professionals and providing our clients with proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.

November 3, 2017

Top Five Books for Managers #1: 13 Fatal Errors Managers Make and How You can Avoid Them

This is the first in a series of five posts by management expert, Jeannie Finkel. In this series, Jeannie weighs in on the top five books for managers, featuring one book each week.

Being a great manager is a skill that benefits from constant honing and refinement. While some are born with the innate ability to influence others, inspire action, and drive results, most leaders require a great deal of training, practice, and studying to become as effective as they hope to be. There are many incredible management training courses available, but they can be very pricey. Luckily, there is a wealth of information that can help you transform the way you lead and manage your team available for free, from the local library.

While some are born with the innate ability to influence others, most leaders require a great deal of training. Click To Tweet
Thirteen Fatal Errors Managers Make Book Cover
The Top Five Books for Managers

 

Book #1: 13 Fatal Errors Managers Make and How You Can Avoid Them

Author: W. Steven Brown

 

What it’s all about: Brown draws on his years of experience as a sales and management coach and consultant, working with Fortune 500 companies, to identify the top errors managers tend to make repeatedly, so we can recognize and stop doing them, or better yet, avoid committing them in the first place. The good and somewhat surprising news he shares is that there really aren’t that many – just 13 of them! He describes each one clearly, illuminating why the error gets in the way of achieving our goals as managers, and provides stories, examples, and suggestions to help us understand what the error looks like and how to correct it. He also ends chapters with helpful tools and a workbook section to create an action plan, summarize your key learnings, and think about how you’ll apply them.

 

What You’ll Learn: Whether you’re a new manager or one who’s been around a long time, there’s something in this little book for everyone. For newer managers, especially if you’ve been promoted from among a group of your former friends and peers, the transition to the role of “boss” and having to hold your friends accountable, can be very tough. For those in this tricky situation, the chapter,Fatal Error #8: Be a Buddy, Not a Boss,” might really help.

 

For more experienced managers, who find yourselves wishing you could get your team to be more productive, there are great insights in the chapters “Fatal Error #3: Try to Control Results Instead of Influencing Thinking,” and “Fatal Error #7: Concentrate on Problems Rather than Objectives.” Or, maybe you’ve always been a top performer, and even though you set a high bar for your team, somehow, you know they can do even better. The chapters, “Fatal Error #5: Manage Everyone the Same Way,” and “Fatal Error #12 Recognize Only Top Performers,” could provide some good tips!

 

Why it’s a Must Read: I bumped into this book soon after it was first published, when I was a young manager. It was a godsend to me, as the firm I worked for did not provide any management training so I had to figure things out for myself. I discovered that I was committing most of these errors, and I quickly realized that the suggestions the author provided actually work. When I applied them to my own role, I became a much better leader of people, in large part because of the simple lessons this book offers.

 

This is a top management book I revisit every so often, and I recommend it to any new manager who’s just starting their leadership journey, as well as more experienced managers looking to strengthen their leadership skills. It’s really easy to read – you can probably finish it on a cross country plane flight or quiet Sunday afternoon – but the wisdom sticks with you long afterwards!

 

Look out for more book recommendations from management expert, Jeannie Finkel, as we continue our series on The Top Five Books for Managers. No matter where you are in your career, feeding your student mentality with advice from the top management experts can only aid you in your quest to reach your current and future goals and achieve success.

 

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

portrait of Jeanie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.
Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor.

Jeannie Finkel, Chief People Officer at Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales, has more than twenty-five years of business experience, managing human resources and administration at top firms. Jeannie served for nearly twelve years as a Senior Vice President of Human Resources at Charles Schwab & Co. Jeannie was also Head of Human Resources and Administration for a leading asset management firm, and she served as Managing Director, Talent Management Systems and Strategies for a Fortune 100 organization. Jeannie later became a Partner with leading global retained search firm, Heidrick & Struggles. With years of experience managing teams and overseeing organizations, Jeannie is a seasoned expert in management, administration, and leadership.

November 1, 2017

The Top Five Leadership Lessons I Learned from Historical Leaders

 

Gary Polson, Cydcor CEO, speaking on stage.
Top Five Leadership Lessons I Learned from Historical Leaders

There are no better examples of leadership than the legacies of our great historical leaders. While they achieved tremendous fame, they did not do so without facing the occasional failure and enduring hardship. As we strive to become better leaders and learn how to inspire others, we would do well to reflect on the greatest leaders from history to see the characteristics, mentality, and habits that allowed these most revered leaders challenge norms, empower the oppressed, galvanize action, and spark change.

 

Here are the five best leadership lessons I learned from some of my favorite historical leaders:

 

Lesson One: Learn from the Past

The best sources for what works in leadership are the lessons of the past. The trials and tribulations of historical leaders, while sometimes on a grander scale than our own lives, can teach us how to succeed or fail. We can learn how to lead effectively from reading about or watching movies on history, and anyone hoping to become a better leader should make a habit of it. Why make your own mistakes when you can benefit from the lessons learned by those who eventually achieved greatness? Study their lives, follow in their footsteps, and apply their leadership approaches as you drive your own team to reach its goals.

 

Lesson Two: Character Matters

The greatest historical leaders knew that character can often matter even more than ideas when it comes to leading others to find the greatness in themselves. Benjamin Franklin identified Thirteen Critical Virtues necessary for a successful live and vowed to exemplify them. George Washington is admired for his honesty, and Gandhi demonstrated remarkable restraint and self-discipline in his use of non-violent protest to drive change. Whether reading about George Washington, Ben Franklin, Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King or Nelson Mandela, their character stood out and earned them respect, built trust with others, and translated to a highly-regarded reputation.

You must be bold, and you must accept that you will sometimes fail. Click To Tweet

 

Lesson Three: Take Risks

You must be bold, and you must accept that you will sometimes fail. Failing can be an important stop on route to success. Lincoln lost a number of elections, including the Illinois Senate race in 1858, yet he ran for President in 1860. Washington struggled to win a major battle against the British for years, yet he had the courage to stay the course. Gandhi, King and Mandela were humiliated for many years on their paths toward civil rights and representation. Facing the occasional failure is a sign that you took on challenges, pushed yourself outside of your comfort zone, and it is an opportunity to prove your resilience and willingness to learn from your mistakes.

 

Lesson Four: You are Not a Victim of Your Circumstances

We can rise above poverty, lack of education, or lack of support to achieve greatness. Charlie Chaplin grew up in the direst circumstances, reminiscent of a Dickens novel, yet he revolutionized silent film. Men and women who had once been slaves and peasants, overcame the odds to become generals, emperors, and queens. While challenges can sometimes feel insurmountable, the stories of remarkable historical leaders prove that even when things seem hopeless, determination, passion, and grit can overcome the odds.

History teaches that our potential is boundless if we are willing to push ourselves. Click To Tweet

 

Lesson Five: Self Discipline is a Must

Lincoln had just one year of formal education, but he read constantly to feed his curiosity and continued to expand his knowledge. Franklin devised ways to improve his character by evaluating himself daily, assessing one character trait each day. Michael Jordan and Kobe Bryant were relentless in their routines to develop their skills and conditioning. The stories of great leaders of the past up to the present teach that our potential is boundless if we are willing to push ourselves. Achieving greatness as a leader means having the passion and drive to continuously transform yourself and expand your boundaries. Nobody will do that for you. To become a leader that can inspire others and provoke action, you must first be willing to lead yourself.

 

History is full of incredible stories of leaders who rose above their circumstances, exemplified character, and endured and overcame setbacks on their path to success. By studying their stories and seeking to understand which qualities and actions allowed them to achieve greatness, you can improve your own chances of doing the same. The stories of historical leaders are a goldmine from which I have learned so much about the kind of leader I hope to be.

 

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

Gary Polson is Chief Executive Officer and Chairman at Cydcor, the market leader in outsourced sales. With more than 25 years of business operations experience in accounting, legal and senior management, Gary has propelled Cydcor to unprecedented achievement with clients, culture and philanthropy since 2001. Under his leadership, Cydcor has increased its revenue more than six-fold since 2001 and has been recognized as “…the most respected sales outsourcing company in the world” by Datamonitor and The Black Book of Outsourcing, one of the “Best Places to Work” by the Los Angeles Business Journal for eight consecutive years. Gary’s passion for excellence and never-satisfied approach has led Cydcor to earn both industry and employer recognition. With Gary at its helm, Cydcor has built its reputation on maintaining long term relationships with clients by consistently delivering results and by going above and beyond to help Cydcor’s clients gain market share and grow.

 

October 25, 2017

From Failure to Fame: 7 Celebrities who Survived and Thrived after Setbacks

What would have happened if Walt Disney gave up animation after being fired from one of his first jobs? What if J.K. Rowling let depression keep her from picking up a pen? What if Steven Spielberg let self-doubt stop him from making Jaws? While we’ve all heard the expression “overnight success,” but stories of instant fame and wealth are the exception, not the rule. More often than not, the most successful celebrities and entrepreneurs in the world endured at least one, if not a string, of setbacks, failures, and blows to their egos before hitting it big. Remarkably, they all kept at it, and went from failure to fame, achieving success beyond anyone’s expectations, even their own. Had they let those temporary roadblocks hold them back, however, they might have allowed those failures to define them. Most of us will fail at some point in our lives, and we’ll probably do it more than once. But, letting the occasional defeat stop you from pursuing your passion could mean denying yourself the opportunity to achieve more than you ever dreamed possible. Each of these, now famous, celebrities started out just like you.

 

More often than not, the most successful celebrities in the world endured major setbacks before hitting it big. Click To Tweet

 

These seven celebrities faced major setbacks and kept going:

 

Bill Gates Portrait
Seven Celebrities who Survived and Thrived after Setbacks
Photo source: Paulo Henrick

 

  1. Bill Gates Couldn’t Launch a Successful Company

It’s hard to imagine now that he’s one of the richest and most powerful entrepreneurs in the world, but those who met Gates right after his first company, Traf-O-Data failed in 1980, might not have been too impressed with his business acumen. The company, which he created while he was in his senior year of high school with business partner Paul Allen, seemed like a clever solution for gathering traffic-flow data, except for one problem, they didn’t have any customers. Gates and Allen got so caught up in the technology, they forgot to do any market research. Don’t feel too bad for Gates though, as of September 2017, the Microsoft Corporation cofounder is the richest person in the word, with an estimated net worth of $84.8 billion, according to Wikipedia.

 

Walt Disney Portrait
Walt Disney rose from failure to fame after being told he lacked creativity.

 

  1. Walt Disney Lacked Creativity

He may be the father of the world’s most beloved animated mouse and the founder of what would grow into a multi-billion-dollar, mega-empire, but as a young cartoonist, not everyone could see his potential. In 1919, the Kansas City Star newspaper fired Disney because, according to his editor, he “lacked imagination and had no good ideas.” Lucky for Disney, his creative drought would eventually end, allowing him to go from failure to fame after coming up with a few good ideas that just happened to change entertainment forever, including Mickey Mouse, the multi-plane camera, and Disneyland. This one-time labeled, “creative dunce” also holds the record for most Academy Awards as a film producer.

 

Albert Einstein Portrait
Albert Einstein found success after setbacks. As a child, teachers worried he lacked intelligence.

 

  1. Albert Einstein was a Slow Learner

He might be the most recognizable and best-know scientific genius of all time, but as a child, Albert Einstein was so far behind developmentally, that teachers were concerned he might have been mentally disabled. The Nobel-prize-winning physicist didn’t speak until he was four years old and didn’t read until he was seven. He would later be expelled from one school and refused admittance to another one in the years before he took the physics world by storm.

Albert Einstein didn’t speak until he was four years old and didn’t read until he was seven. Click To Tweet
J.K. Rowling Portrait
J.K. Rowling went from failure to fame, overcoming depression to write her books.

 

  1. J.K. Rowling was a Penniless, Single Mom

She may be mom to the world’s favorite boy wizard, but before that, Rowling was a broke mom. Recently divorced, on welfare, and clinically depressed, she struggled for five years to complete the first Harry Potter book, writing while her new baby napped. The book was rejected twelve times before finding a publisher, and the rest is history. Fighting her way from failure to fame, today, J.K. Rowling  is wealthiest author of all time, and one of the richest women in the world.

 

Vera Wang Portrait
Designer Vera Wang rose to fame and succeeded after a major setback.
Image credit: David Shankbone

 

  1. Vera Wang was an Olympic Team Reject

While women all over the world fantasize about their dream wedding, themselves picture-perfect in a designer, Vera Wang gown, Wang herself dreamed of representing the United States as part of the 1968 US Olympic figure-skating team. But, after years of intense training, she failed to make the team. Later, after serving 15 years as a senior editor at Vogue magazine, she was overlooked when it came time to name the magazine’s new editor-in-chief. It wasn’t until she was 40 years old that she began her designing career, and the rest is history. Today, Vera Wang’s brand is worth over $1 billion, and the average Vera Wang wedding gown can sell for upwards of $13,000.

 

Stephen King Portrait
Stephen King overcame many setbacks to rise from failure to fame as a bestselling author.
Photo credit: pinguino, Flckr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

 

  1. Stephen King Wrote Books Nobody Wanted

Before becoming the master of suspense he is today, Stephen King had more than a little trouble getting his writing career off the ground. A few publishers apparently thought Kings first novel, Carrie, wasn’t up to par – 30 to be exact. King got so fed up with the constant string of rejections that he threw the manuscript for Carrie in the trash. Lucky for horror fans around the world, King’s wife, confident in her husband’s talent, retrieved the book and encouraged him to keep going. Eventually, the writer would discover that one or two people were actually interested in what he had to say; King has published more than 50 novels and has sold more than 350 million copies of his books. His work has also been transformed into dozens of award winning movies and series including The Shining, The Shawshank Redemption, Misery, and the story he, himself, once trashed, Carrie.

 

Steven Spielberg Portrait
Steven Spielberg got rejected from film school but still rose from failure to fame as one of the world’s favorite directors. Photo credit: Gage Skidmore

 

  1. Steven Spielberg Couldn’t Get into Film School

Jaws. E.T. Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Jurassic Park. They’re probably some of your favorites, and you’re not alone. Steven Spielberg’s movies include some of the highest grossing blockbusters of all time. In fact, he is said to have invented the concept of summer blockbuster with the release of Jaws, for the first time, creating the kind of fan fervor, and lines around the block, we often see today. He’s won multiple academy awards, and he is possibly the most recognizable film director in the world. As a young, aspiring director and film student, however, Spielberg was rejected from USC’s top-ranked film school three times, because of his mediocre grades. Don’t feel too bad for poor Steven though, the school would eventually award him an honorary degree in 1994, after making some generous donations, that most likely didn’t put a dent in his $3 billion estimated net worth.

Realize that each failure is just bringing you one step closer to your destiny. Click To Tweet

The next time someone tells you to give up, calls you untalented, or rejects your idea, remember you know best what you are capable of. Take your failures in stride and realize that each one is just bringing you one step closer to your destiny. You can become your own success story. Don’t give up on you dreams, Instead, use those naysayers to fuel your desire to persevere and make your dreams a reality. Give it everything you’ve got, and remember that today you might feel like a failure, but the only way you truly fail is by giving up. Brush yourself off, stay committed, and live to fight another day, and you might be surprised what you can achieve.

To find out more about Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company based in Canada to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, Cydcor has built our name on provide our clients with exceptional sales professionals and proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.

October 18, 2017

5 Tips for Remembering Names

Hello My Name is Words on Chalkboard
5 Tips for Remembering Names

There’s the approach. Then the smile of recognition. The beginning of a friendly greeting. Then…a blank. For budding business relationships, there’s nothing quite like that awkward feeling that accompanies a moment of forgetfulness. Remembering people’s names is something that sets relationships on the right path and sets you apart from the crowd. Hone your craft with the help of these five tips for remembering names.

Remembering people’s names sets relationships on the right path and sets you apart from the crowd. Click To Tweet
  1. Change your perspective.

You never know what a new relationship can lead to. Treat each meeting like it could be the beginning of something great. Approach each new interaction with the mindset that it might have an impact on your future. Remember that the conversation you are having and the person you are meeting are important—and that this relationship could turn out to be more significant than you know. With this attitude as your starting point, you will naturally place a higher priority on remembering people’s names.

 

  1. Tune out distractions.

When meeting new people, remembering names can come down to one simple act: really listening. It may sound obvious, but in the busy reality of our lives, giving our full attention might not always be so easy. When you’re meeting someone, cast aside other tasks and focus on the interaction that’s right in front of you. Instead of thinking about the next thing you’re going to say, focus on the person’s name as they’re saying it to you. If you happen to miss it the first time around, don’t fake it. Instead, show them the importance of your conversation by apologizing and asking to hear it again.

 

  1. Use it, or lose it.

A simple tip for remembering names is using it immediately in conversation. Perhaps the easiest way to accomplish this is to repeat it back to them right away, saying something like, “Nice to meet you, Gail.” Another possible tactic is to ask them which form of their name they prefer. Asking if it’s Dave or David builds in another ordinary repetition of their name to help you remember. After this, using their name naturally—that is, occasionally—in the rest of your conversation will help to make it stick in your mind even more. Just be careful not to overdo it, or you could begin to sound robotic.

 

  1. Make a connection.

For some, associating a name with another concept is a helpful strategy for remembering people’s names. This can take many forms, and it’s entirely up to you to choose which way works best. It can be as simple associating their name with a particular detail they reveal about themselves, like a hobby or interest. You can also come up with a rhyme or a piece of alliteration to help you remember.

 

  1. Make a note.

After meeting someone, a very effective way to remember their name is to write it down. Whenever possible, write it down by hand, rather than on your phone or computer. Research shows that the act writing things down helps nurture comprehension and retention. What’s more, by jotting down a person’s name and any important details from your meeting you can refer back to these notes in the future to help make the most of your new relationship.

Remembering people’s names isn’t rocket science. In most cases, it just comes down to good habits Click To Tweet

Remembering people’s names isn’t rocket science. In most cases, it just comes down to good habits. To make any new behavior a habit, you must decide that it’s important enough to you and your professional future to do the work it will take to make that behavior a regular part of your routine. While remembering names can sometimes seem insignificant, it could easily give you that edge over a competitor when fighting for a big project, interviewing for a job, or attempting to earn a client’s business.

To get inspired and read other helpful sales and business insights from Cydcor, check us out on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Twitter.

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company based in Canada to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, Cydcor has built our name on provide our clients with exceptional sales professionals and  proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.

October 11, 2017

Tips for Building and Maintaining Personal Resilience

A road sign warning that says "Keep Going".
Tips for Building & Maintaining Personal Resilience in Business

Building resilience is one of the cornerstones of success in business—especially entrepreneurial pursuits. The ability to pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and get right back to the task at hand is paramount to success in business, at every level.

 

Whether you’re a seasoned sales professional or just starting out on your entrepreneurial journey, these tips for building and maintaining personal resilience will put you on the path toward having the strength and flexibility required for success.

 

Pick Your Battles

Knowing your strengths is a key component to success in any endeavor; leveraging your strengths in your work will get you farther, faster, than spinning your wheels in areas where you lack knowhow and confidence. No one is good at everything, though, and learning when to power through a difficult course of action versus when to delegate is important. Building resilience includes challenging oneself, but it also means knowing when a task is best given to someone else—and being OK with that.

Building resilience includes challenging oneself, but it also means knowing when it's best to delegate. Click To Tweet

Build & Maintain Your Self Confidence

Building personal resilience relies heavily on recognizing your strengths and maintaining your confidence in them. You know what you know—make sure others know it too! Personal resilience takes practice and self-reflection. Take some time to honestly consider which facets of your profession you’re best at and make a list you can reference to boost your self-confidence and bolster your self-awareness.

 

Hone Your Skills

When you know your strengths, you can get to work on improving them. When your areas of expertise and your specialized skills are all second nature, the business of bouncing back from times of difficulty—or even failure—becomes easier. Call on your talents, experience, and knowledge to help you get through tough times, and build on those unique advantages to move on from setbacks. Honing your skills also reinforces your self-confidence, creating a powerful feedback loop for yourself as you maintain your personal resilience.

 

Be a Team Player

Business is built on relationships. You want—need—to be someone people want to work with. Reliable. Helpful. Trustworthy. Talented. The list of superlatives people want from their teammates and networks can go on and on, but the bottom line is this: being an indispensable member of your professional community is key to building professional and personal resilience. When your network is strong, bouncing back and moving forward—and extending successes—is much easier, because you can call on those relationships as you seek new opportunities, constructive feedback, and emotional support.

Being an indispensable member of your professional community is key to building personal resilience. Click To Tweet

Manage Emotions During Losses—and Wins

 

The most resilient people have a keen understanding of their emotions and are skilled at managing them. This doesn’t mean building resilience requires stoicism—the opposite, in fact. Those who take the time to see the good in things and spread their positive outlook find it easier to work through rough patches. They see each experience, positive or negative, as a way to learn. These are also the people who are self-aware enough to see when things are going well and celebrate them.

 

What strategies do you use for building your personal resilience? Share your thoughts on Twitter and be sure to follow @Cydcor on Instagram to learn more about our company and our culture.

 

We are Cydcor, the recognized leader in outsourced sales services. From our humble beginnings as an independent sales company based in Canada to garnering a reputation as the global leader in outsourced sales, Cydcor has come a long way. We’ve done this by having exceptional sales professionals and providing our clients with proven sales and marketing strategies that get results.